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2 big changes considered by Premier League

2 big changes considered by Premier League


2 big changes considered by Premier League
MANCHESTER, ENGLAND – DECEMBER 29: The Big screen shows the VAR check for a possible offside during the Premier League match between Manchester City and Sheffield United at Etihad Stadium on December 29, 2019 in Manchester, United Kingdom. (Photo by Michael Regan/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND: Reiss Nelson of Arsenal receives treatment for a leg injury during the friendly between Arsenal and Juventus at Emirates Stadium on December 17, 2022. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND: Reiss Nelson of Arsenal receives treatment for an injury during the friendly between Arsenal and Juventus at Emirates Stadium on December 17, 2022. (Photo by Ryan Pierse/Getty Images)

ESPN report that the Premier League haven’t yet decided whether or not to introduce semi-automated offside reviews next season.

The system was in use for the World Cup and this season’s Champions League, but there are no guarantees the Premier League will bring it in next year.

However, the Premier League, the MLS, and Ligue 1 are all lobbying IFAB to trial temporary concussion substitutions from next season.

As it stands, players remain on the pitch while they’re assessed, and can then be taken off in a free substitution. But they can’t return to the field once they’ve left it.

The Premier League want to be able to take players out of the game for a 10-minute assessment, at which point they can return if they’ve been given the all-clear.

Some other leagues are reportedly against the temporary substitutions, and IFAB will reveal their decision in March.

LEEDS, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 16: Referee Chris Kavanagh checks the VAR screen before giving a penalty to Leeds United during the Premier League match between Leeds United and Arsenal FC at Elland Road on October 16, 2022 in Leeds, England. (Photo by Alex Pantling/Getty Images)
LEEDS, ENGLAND: Referee Chris Kavanagh checks the VAR screen before giving a penalty to Leeds United during the Premier League match between Leeds United and Arsenal FC at Elland Road on October 16, 2022. (Photo by Alex Pantling/Getty Images)

Personally, I feel both ideas are worthwhile introductions to the Premier League.

The semi-automated offside system sped up offside calls during the World Cup, and produced a clear graphic to show the decision afterwards. It also significantly reduced the possibility of human error in the process, making decisions much more reliable.

The downsides are that even millimetre offsides will be given, which some fans don’t like, and that the graphic often took many minutes to be shown to the supporters at the World Cup, which led to some initial confusion.

If they could show the graphic more quickly, then the occasional (technically correct) millimetre offside call would be worth the improved speed and accuracy of the system as a whole.

As for the concussion substitutions, it just seems silly that players are still able to try to play on when they’re clearly concussed.

These substitutions would hopefully eliminate that, as well as speed up the game – as we wouldn’t have to wait for the assessment to take place on the pitch.

It’s up to IFAB and the Premier League to make the call now.



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